Tip of the Ozarks Puppies

Tip of the Ozarks Puppies strive to provide families with healthy, happy puppies.

Bichon Frise 

Country of Origin: The Bichon Frise (meaning ‘curly lap dog’, also known as a ‘Bichon Tenerife’ or ‘Bichon a Poil Frise’, if you want to be fancy about it) descends from the Barbet, a Mediterranean breed. The Barbet was cross bred with a small coated white breed to derive the Bichon. Bichons were classified under four categories: the Havanese, Bolognese, Maltaise, and Tenerife, from which the Bichon Frise ultimately descended. They were brought home from the Canary Islands by Italian sailors in the 1300’s and became popular pets for the French and Italian upper class, including King Francis I. Bichon Frises sank in popularity through World War I to the point of nearly being lost, but survived via their popularity as tricksters, accompanying street minstrels. French breeders in the 1930’s made an effort to revive the breed, which finally took off in popularity after being brought to America in the 1950’s.

Size: The Bichon Frise has a shoulder height of 23-30 cm (9-12 in) and weighs 3-5 kg (7-12 lbs). It is a short, puffy breed with round, dark eyes, drop ears, a furry tail curled over the back, and round feet. Bichon Frises have long, elegant necks, strong chests, short muzzles, and a scissors bite. They have a dark halo around the eyes and a dark nose and lips, giving an inquisitive facial expression.

Coat: The Bichon Frise has a white colored double coat consisting of a soft, silky, dense undercoat and coarse, curly, outer coat. The coat springs back when patted and is puffy in appearance. The coat may have cream or apricot shadings, which will fade during the puppy’s first year. The Bichon Frise is highly hypoallergenic and does not shed, making it a good breed for those with allergies. There are two popular Bichon Frise grooming styles: a short, poodle-like coat or a long, puffy coat for a more rounded appearance.

Character: The Bichon Frise is sensitive, responsive, affectionate, and abundantly playful. It is a perky, jumpy, happy dog that loves companionship and is happy to cuddle up. Bichon Frises have an easy, happy disposition.

Temperament: The Bichon Frise is eager to make friends with strangers, other dogs and children. It may bark frequently or tend to nip when playing. Bichon Frises make an excellent addition to the family. Like cats, they have sudden spikes of energy which cause them to run wildly around the house.

Care: The Bichon Frise’s coat needs to be brushed and combed every other day and trimmed every two months. Bichon Frises should be groomed from an early age so that they are at ease with the process, since they will undergo it frequently. The grooming process should be made as comfortable as possible. The Bichon Frise’s Foot and ear hair should also be trimmed occasionally, and the hind area should be cleaned with a damp cloth. Bichon Frises must have plenty of human companionship. They may have allergies or be sensitive to flea bites. Bichon Frises have a life span of 12-13 years and have litters of 4-5 pups.

Training: The Bichon Frise is highly intelligent, making training a fairly simple task. It is able to learn a wide variety of tricks. Males may be easier to train than females. Bichon Frises can be difficult to house train; crate training may be a successful technique.

Activity: The Bichon Frise is an active dog that needs daily exercise. Despite its small size, it is eager to play vigorous indoor games, romp in the yard, or take short walks on the leash. Bichon Frises can adapt to apartment life fairly easily.

 

Boston Terrier

Country of Origin: England/United States.

Size: 15 - 17 inches. They weigh between 10-25 pounds but should not exceed 25 pounds.

Coat: Black with white markings or black roan.

Character: The Boston Terrier is intelligent, enthusiastic, affectionate and playful.

Temperament: This breed gets along well with other pets, dogs, and children.

Care: Not much grooming is required. Occasional brushing should be sufficient.

Training: This dog learns fast. It is very sensitive to the sound of your voice.

Activity: Boston terriers love to play. Their exercise needs are moderate. No long walks are necessary.

 

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Country of Origin: The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (affectionately known as a ‘Cav’) is an offshoot of the King Charles Spaniel. The King Charles Spaniel was created by crossing small Spaniels with a short snouted breed such as the Pug or Japanese Chin. It was brought to Scotland from Continental Europe (possibly by Mary, Queen of Scots) in the 1500’s or 1600’s, where it became a fashionable lap dog and companion for the noble class. King Charles Spaniels were also popular lap warmers (and flea magnets) for the lower class. King Charles II, for whom the breed is named, grew up with a pet King Charles Spaniel (then known as the Toy Spaniel), and was such a big fan of the breed that he was accused of neglecting his official duties to spend time with his pet Spaniels. He once issued a decree that the breed could not be forbidden entry to any building, including Parliament! Some King Charles Spaniels, such as the red and white ‘Blenheims’, served as hunting dogs, but most strains were bred for appearance rather than work capacity. Over the years, the breed became smaller with a shorter nose. In the 1920’s, a wealthy American man named Roswell Eldrige traveled to England and offered 25 pounds, a large sum at the time, for an ‘old style’ or ‘pointed nose’ version of the breed, similar to Charles II’s actual dog. The effort was successful, and the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel eventually surpassed its short nosed cousin in popularity, achieving American Kennel Club recognition in 1996.

Size: The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel has a shoulder height of 30-33 cm (12-13 in) and weighs 5-8 kg (12-18 lbs). It has a large muzzle, large eyes, and long, highly set ears. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels have a flat back and breed-characteristic feathered feet. Unlike most Spaniels, they have a long, feathered tail which is carried high and moves when the dog runs.

Coat: The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel has long, soft, silky hair which is lightly waved. There are four color types which were formerly considered separate breeds: tricolor (‘Prince Charles’), red and white (‘Blenheim’), black and tan (‘King Charles’) and red (‘Ruby’). The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is an average shedder.

Character: The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel loves to be with its family and craves attention. It is cheerful, playful, and intelligent—an ideal dog to carry with you and share your time with. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels do not bark frequently. They are generally well behaved, but can sometimes be timid or stubborn.

Temperament: The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel gets along well with children (older children are preferable), other dogs, and any household pets. It is friendly, happy, and loving. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are devoted to loved ones but suspicious around strangers.

Care: The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel must be brushed several times a week. It should be bathed only when necessary. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels have a life span of 10-12 years. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are susceptible to mitral valve disease (a heart condition) and syringomyelia (a spinal condition), which afflicts many members of the breed. They may have a soft spot in the skull, which closes by adulthood and is not considered a risk. Fused toes are also not considered a health risk. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels may be sensitive to anesthesia and hot weather.

Training: The intelligence of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel makes training fairly easy. This breed requires a gentle approach.

Activity: The exercise needs of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel are uncomplicated. It enjoys walks, but its needs can usually be met with indoor play; it will adapt itself to the activity level of your family. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is well suited to apartment life. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel should be leashed or watched closely around roads as it tends to give chase to small animals.

 

Maltese

Country of Origin: The Maltese (also known as the ‘Bichon Maltiase’) is the most ancient toy breed of Europe, hailing from the Mediterranean island Malta, an ancient trading port. The first written evidence of the Maltese comes from the third century B.C. Over the centuries this breed has been known by many names, including the ‘Shock Dog’, ‘Maltese Lion Dog’, ‘Spaniel Gentle’, ‘Comforter Dog’, ‘Roman Ladies’ Dog’, and my personal favorite, ‘Ye Ancient Dogge of Malta’. The name ‘Maltese’ was only assigned in the 20th century. The breed’s origins are unknown; it may descend from Spitz or an Asian breed such as the Tibetan Terrier. Maltese may have been used to hunt rodents before their royal appearance became paramount. In any case, the small, white Maltese remained isolated on the island of Malta for centuries and hence stayed true to breed. Eventually, they were exported throughout Europe and became popular with the upper class, purportedly including Mary, Queen of Scotts, Josephine Bonaparte, and Marie Antoinette. The Maltese was first imported to America in the 1870’s and recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1888. Today it is a popular show dog. Publius, Roman governor of Malta in the early first century A.D, had a Maltese named Issa who was immortalized by poet Marcus Valerius Martialis: ‘Issa is more frolicsome than Catulla's sparrow, Issa is purer than a dove's kiss. Issa is gentler than a maiden. Issa is more precious than Indian gems...Lest the last days that she sees light should snatch her from him forever, Publius has had her picture painted.’

Size: The Maltese has a shoulder height of 20-25 cm (8-10 in). Maltese have a domed skull, round dark eyes surrounded by a dark ‘halo’, wide, black, nose, and low ears covered by long hair. Some have a ‘winter nose’ which fades to pink in the winter; the color change can be permanent in older dogs. The Maltese carries its tail over the back and to one side and has small, round feet.

Coat: The Maltese has a distinctive long, white, silky coat with no undercoat. Some standards allow cream or lemon colored ears. The Maltese does not shed and is a good match for those with allergies.

Character: The Maltese is eager to learn, fearless, friendly, and sociable. Its high energy level may overwhelm new owners who aren’t prepared for it. Maltese are not prone to excessive barking, but their tendency to bark at suspicious activity makes them excellent watchdogs. They love to cuddle, but are not overly demanding of attention.

Temperament: Maltese easily befriend other dogs and cats, even much larger ones. Maltese puppies may be too playful for small infants. Maltese will bark at strangers but grow used to them quickly.

Care: The Maltese requires quite a bit of grooming, from daily brushing and combing to special lotions to remove tear stains (careful brushing with a warm metal comb works as well). Dead hair should be brushed out, as the Maltese does not shed. Irritating hairs around the eyes need to be removed. Some pet Maltese are trimmed in a ‘puppy cut’ of 1 to 2 inches in length over the entire body for easier maintenance. Some show dogs are ‘wrapped’ to prevent matting of the fur. The Maltese has a lifespan of 12-14 years, though some live as long as 18 years. Most are healthy, but some are prone to heart issues such as prolapsed valve syndrome and enlarged ventricle, which usually present around the 10th year and can be controlled with medication. Many Maltese have dental issues. They can begin losing teeth by the age of 8 if not properly cleaned. Maltese are prone to sunburns where their hair parts. They get cold easily in chilly climates but can also become quickly overheated as they do not easily dissipate heat.

Training: Encouragement rather than harsh words should always be used when training the Maltese. They are very sensitive. Maltese are very difficult to housebreak and may need to be paper or box trained.

Activity: The Maltese does not require a great amount of exercise. It can have its needs met by indoor play and activities, and enjoys playing chase. Maltese are well suited to apartment life.

 

Toy Poodle

Country of Origin: France has been officially recognized as the Poodle’s country of origin, but the Poodle’s earlier ancestors came from central Asia. The German variety has probably influenced the modern breed most (‘Poodle’ is German for ‘splash’ or ‘puddle’). In 18th and 19th century Europe, the Poodle served a wide variety of purposes, including duck hunting, guiding, and later circus performing, from whence the modern grooming style likely arose. The Poodle became a popular pet for the French aristocracy, and in time was officially adopted as the national dog. Poodles were imported to America in the 20th century. They slowly rose in popularity and eventually became the country’s most popular dog. Famous Poodles include author John Steinbeck’s dog Charley, subject of the book ‘Travels with Charley: In Search of America’, and Weird Al’s Poodle Bela, who…uhm… sat on his head for the album cover of ‘Poodle Hat.’

Size: Toy Poodles have a shoulder height of up to 25 cm (10 in) and weigh 3-4 kg (6-9 lbs). Poodles are very elegant in appearance. They have a long, narrow muzzle, slight stop (point at which the forehead meets the muzzle), dark eyes, and wide ears. Toy Poodles have flat backs, straight, docked tails and small, oval feet. Their length is approximately the same as their height.

Coat: The Toy Poodle has a distinctive fine, frizzy, wooly coat similar in texture to sheep’s wool. Solid white is most common, but the coat may also be solid grey, brown, apricot, or black. There are three distinct grooming styles for show Poodles: puppy clip, continental clip, and English saddle clip. The puppy clip entails shaving the face, throat, feet, and base of the tail. The upper legs and hindquarters are also shaved in the continental clip (currently the most popular), leaving ‘pom poms’ around the ankles. The English saddle clip is similar, but the hindquarters are left mostly unshaved. All show clips require heavy maintenance, thus pet clips commonly entail shorter hair over the entire body. Poodle hair can be formed in a ‘corded’ style, in which the hair is allowed to mat into long, thing rows rather than being brushed out. This is difficult to maintain, and now rare. Toy Poodles do not shed, making them a good match for allergy sufferers, for which reason they are commonly used for crossbreeding.

Character: The Toy Poodle is sensitive, intelligent, lively, playful, proud, and elegant. It bonds closely with family and makes a great companion. Toy Poodles are very smart, obedient, and graceful, which makes them one of the most popular pets in the world. The Toy Poodle is bouncy, alert, and usually eager to play. Toy Poodles are more energetic than Standard Poodles, and more likely to bark.

Temperament: The Toy Poodle gets along well with other animals, other dogs, and children. It is best to socialize it as a puppy. Toy Poodles will announce the arrival of visitors, but are generally friendly toward them. Poodles are highly adaptable and make good watchdogs. They may find their way into some mischief! Small children should be watched around Toy Poodles to prevent snapping or rough play.

Care: Show Poodles should be groomed by professionals, and will require a substantial investment of time and money. Poodles which are not intended for show competitions usually have longer hair on the head, legs, and ears, and are trimmed every five to six weeks. Toy Poodles have a long lifespan of 13-15 years. The Poodle is susceptible to cataracts and eye problems. Toy Poodles which are not shaven carefully can suffer skin irritation or rashes. Meals should be spread throughout the day to avoid bloat. Toy Poodles require frequent human companionship and should not be left to live outdoors.

Training: The Toy Poodle is highly intelligent, making training a fairly simple process. They quickly understand what is expected of them and can learn a wide variety of tricks and games. Poodles are likely to enjoy the training process. Any effort put into training the Poodle will reap large rewards.

Activity: The Toy Poodle requires less exercise then the Standard Poodle, but should be walked or allowed to play outdoors. It should do fine with apartment life.lick to add text, images, and other content

Shih Tzu

Country of Origin: The Shih Tzu, also known as the ‘Chinese Lion Dog’, ‘Chrysanthemum Dog’ (because its face resembles a flower), or ‘Shih Tzu Kou’ (which translates to ‘Lion Dog’, designating its revered status in Buddhism) originates in Tibet as far back as the 1600’s. The Shih Tzu in its current form was primarily developed in China during the reign of Chinese Empress Dowager Cixi in the late 1800’s, likely from crosses of the Pekingese with the Lhasa Apso. The Shih Tzu was a favored pet of royalty, but fell into decline when British troops raided the Forbidden City in 1860. The breed survived, but was generally not distinguished from the Lhasa Apso until 1934, when the smaller, shorter nosed variety was reassigned its original Chinese name, ‘Shih Tzu’. The Shih Tzu was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1969 and has continued to climb in popularity to this day. Crossbreeds between Shih Tzu and other toy breeds are also increasing in popularity, particularly crosses with the Poodle and Bichon Frise.

Size: The Shih Tzu has a shoulder height of about 25 cm (10 in) and weighs 4-7 kg (9-16 lbs). It has a large, domed skull, pronounced stop (depression where the muzzle meets the forehead), undershot bite, and short muzzle. Shih Tzu (the plural noun is the same as the singular) have a tail carried over the back and should have head and tail in correct proportion to the body.

Coat: The Shih Tzu has a long double coat similar in texture to a human’s hair. It can be a variety of colors including black, red, beige, and white. The Shih Tzu is distinguished from the Pekingese by the topknot, or ‘pienji’, on its head. Shih Tzu lose hair gradually as humans do rather than shedding in the standard sense.

Character: The Shih Tzu is an independent dog which is intelligent, dignified, lovable, affectionate, sociable, and cheerful. It is not as outgoing as most breeds. Shih Tzu seldom bark. James Mumford described the breed in American Shih Tzu magazine as ‘A dash of lion, several teaspoons of rabbit, a couple of ounces of domestic cat, one part court jester, a dash of ballerina, a pinch of old man (Chinese), a bit of beggar, a tablespoon of monkey, one part baby seal, a dash of teddy bear and the rest dogs of Tibetan and Chinese origin.’

Temperament: The Shih Tzu gets along well with other household pets and children. Though the Shih Tzu may bark frequently, it does not make a good watchdog.

Care: Shih Tzu with a long show coat require a lot of grooming; to prevent tangles, the coat must be combed every day and professionally groomed every few months. A hair bow or clip is required to keep the hair out of the Shih Tzu’s eyes. Shih Tzu with a shorter ‘puppy coat’ can be trimmed much less frequently. Special eye drops should be applied to keep the eyes clean, ear passages should be cleaned regularly, nails should be clipped monthly, and the face should be wiped after eating. Water can enter the Shih Tzu’s snout easily, for which reason some Shih Tzu are taught to drink from a ‘licker’ like a hamster. The Shih Tzu has a lifespan of 11-14 years. Common health problems are liver shunt (a congenital circulatory disease), renal dysplasia (symptoms include bone fractures and ‘rubber jaw’), eye problems, and in larger dogs, hip dysplasia (malformed hip joint which can cause lameness or arthritis). Scratching in the absence of fleas may indicate an allergy to red dye number 40, a common food additive.

Training: The Shih Tzu’s somewhat obstinate nature makes consistency essential in the training process. Patience is important as housebreaking may be difficult. The Shih Tzu should be taught from puppyhood to relax during the grooming process as it will be a constant throughout the Shih Tzu’s life.

Activity: Shih Tzu require an ample amount of exercise for their small stature. They are happy with daily walks or romps in the yard. Shih Tzu cannot regulate their body temperature easily, which makes them highly prone to heat exposure; they should never be over exercised or left outside in hot weather. The Shih Tzu is well suited to apartment life.

 

Designer Puppies

 (pic of Maltese/Shih Tzu)

The fanciers of designer dogs respond that all modern dog breeds were created from earlier breeds and types of dogs through the same kind of selective breeding that is used to create designer dogs. The Toy Poodle was bred down in size from larger poodles, most likely by crossing with various very small Bichon types, such as the Maltese and Havanese.[9] Most of the modern breeds have ancestries that include various older dog types and breeds; see individual breed articles for details of the origin of each breed.

Health of dog hybrids depends on their being descended from healthy parents. Breeders who select their breeding stock for cost-effectiveness and who skip health testing for the same reason will not produce puppies that are as reliably healthy as those bred by more conscientious breeders. However, studies of longevity in dogs have found some advantage for crossbreeds compared to purebred dogs. "There was a significant correlation between body weight and longevity. Crossbreeds lived longer than average but several pure breeds lived longer than cross breeds, notably Jack Russell, miniature poodles and whippets" (thus only small and toy breeds, as to be expected)[10]. In general it is believed that crossbreed dogs "have a far lower chance of exhibiting the disorders that are common with the parental breeds. Their genetic health will be substantially higher."[11]

Many breeders of designer dogs take advantage of the fact that people are impressed by a pet that is offers them an elevated social status, such as other "designer" goods do. "It’s human nature to aspire to own something a little different, a little fancy or in short supply."[12]

All of our designer puppies are from 1st generation. This means that we only breed purebred parents to give you the most desirable puppy.

 

Although designer dogs are often selected by owners for their novelty, an underlying motive for hybridization is an attempt to reduce the incidence of certain hereditary problems found in the purebred breeds used for the cross, while retaining their more appealing traits. Jon Mooallem in the New York Times writes, "Given the roughly 350 inherited disorders littering the dog genome, crossing two purebreds and expanding their gene pools can be “a phenomenally good idea,” according to one canine geneticist — if it is done conscientiously."

 

The fanciers of designer dogs respond that all modern dog breeds were created from earlier breeds and types of dogs through the same kind of selective breeding that is used to create designer dogs. The Toy Poodle was bred down in size from larger poodles, most likely by crossing with various very small Bichon types, such as the Maltese and Havanese.Most of the modern breeds have ancestries that include various older dog types and breeds; see individual breed articles for details of the origin of each breed.

No one can fully explain to you the size or temperment of a Designer puppy. Read information on both parents.

 

Tip of the Ozarks Puppies will have Designer Puppies occassionally.

 

Mal Shi "Malti Tzu" (Maltese/ShihTzu)  See both breeds.

Malti Poo (Maltese/Poodle) See both breeds.

Shichon "Teddy Bear" (Bichon Frise/Shih Tzu) See both breeds.

Cavapoo (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel/Poodle) See both breeds.

Cavachon (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel/Bichon Frise) See both breeds.

Cockalier (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel/Cocker Spaniel) See both breeds..

Testimonials

  • "I didn't actually directly purchase my puppy from Tip of the Ozarks. A friend of mine did and they found after a week that they weren't puppy people. I purchased Meg (the former..."
    Mary Marsh
    Happy Momma
  • "We have had Jax (Doug) about one month. We love him to death. He is so spunky and cuddly all at the same time. We could not get him use to crate. I think 5 mo might be to old to..."
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